Saul

Hello, Satan, Part 2

1024px-Phoenix-(Sunnyslope)-John_C._Lincoln_Medical_Center-1965

The John C. Lincoln Medical Center in Sunnyslope, Arizona. Named after John C. Lincoln (July 17, 1866 – May 24, 1959) an American inventor, entrepreneur and philanthropist. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Friday

On Friday, 8 February 2019, I checked into the John C. Lincoln hospital in North Phoenix for an angiogram—a one-day medical procedure that would determine treatment for heart disease. Ten minutes into the procedure, the hospital staff attending my cardiologist began to shut down equipment and put away medical instruments.

From here on, I do not know if I write about events that actually happened or from my memory of those events; I only affirm that what I write is true to my memory of what happened—except for the scars. (more…)

Hello, Satan

1017px-William_Blake_-_Satan_Smiting_Job_with_Sore_Boils_-_Google_Art_Project

“Satan Smiting Job with Sore Boils” by William Blake, circa 1826. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Early this morning

     when you knocked upon my door

And I said “Hello, Satan

     I believe it’s time to go.”

Robert Johnson, “Me and the Devil Blues”

I’ve been walking with my friend the Satan for a spell. I’d like to tell you some of what I’ve learned, if you care to listen. (more…)

Saul or David?

"David and Goliath" (1888) by Osmar Schindler.

“David and Goliath” (1888) by Osmar Schindler.

In Abrahamic mythology, God enabled his people to destroy evil giants and to occupy their land.  Oversized pagans were ousted from the promised land by a chosen people.  David, not timid Saul, was fit to lead the people, for David was “a man of valor, a warrior” (1 Samuel 16:18 NRSV).  Young David slew the taunting Goliath; King David and his army killed Philistine giants to secure Israel and Judah.

Killing the ungodly Goliath is a parable of the courage that comes from knowing the faithful underdog is victorious over those who have “defied the armies of the living God” (1 Samuel 17: 36 NRSV).  The parable equates virtue with the strength of courage, evil with the monster’s bluster.  Aggression is symbolically transformed into defense when one fights the Lord’s battle against satanic forces.

The story of David and Goliath is embedded in U.S. war culture.  It projects evil and transforms the world’s most powerful nation into the righteous defender of the oppressed.  Cowering before a bully does not befit an American president to lead the world to glory. (more…)